Can Melatonin Help with Erectile Dysfunction? Why This Hormone Is so Important for Your Sexual Health

Not being able to maintain an erection or even worse not being able to get one at all, can be both extremely embarrassing and frustrating. This is an increasing problem that many men face, one that gets progressively worse as time goes on.

With the life expectancy of both men and women continually rising as medical science allows us to do so, it makes sense that more and more men will experience this problem each year as we progress in to the future.

Erectile dysfunction has been believed to be causes by a variety of different issues as well, further fueling the need for these products, to which the industry has responded. This lead to more research being performed as to the links behind erectile dysfunction, one problem being identified as a lack of melatonin.

What Is Melatonin? Why Might It Help with Erectile Dysfunction?

Melatonin is one of many hormones used by our body, in this case primarily for sleep. This hormone is secreted by the pineal gland, which is located in the brain and which is responsible for the secretion of various hormones. Many of these involve the growth and repair of certain tissues within the body.

Melatonin is used by our body to signal it to go to sleep. The release of this hormone is triggered by darkness, as when it is night time the body amps up the production and release of this hormone in to the blood stream.

Taking melatonin supplements is becoming more popular among many people because the reality is that many of us don’t get enough sleep. On top of that many of us have problems getting to sleep period, which has a lot to do with technology and the light that our devices emit at night.

Either way melatonin supplementation has been shown to help people fall asleep much sooner than they normally would if at all, which allows for a much better nights rest and a better overall feeling as a result.

That Sounds Great, but How Exactly Does Melatonin Affect Erectile Dysfunction?

Melatonin studies have shown promise in their ability to fight erectile dysfunction, which is believed to lie in their antioxidant capabilities. The presence of this hormone in tissues helps to prevent and repair damage, which may help in fighting erectile dysfunction.

One of the biggest causes of erectile dysfunction is improperly functioning blood vessels, which is usually the result of damage. Our diets are a huge factor as far as this damage is concerned, as diabetics and people who are obese are at a much higher risk of developing erectile dysfunction.

Melatonin can help to repair this damage, however it is important to know that it can potentially have side effects. This is why you should seek out a doctor or pharmacist so that they can instruct you on how much you need. This amount will vary from individual to individual, so make sure you know how much is right for you before you go out and purchase it.

Should Anyone Be Concerned About Taking It?

Melatonin is safe for most people in the correct dose, however there are some people that should know the potential side effects if they do. People with autoimmune disorders should be aware that melatonin supplementation could potentially exacerbate the problems by stimulating the immune system.

Women who are pregnant or are looking to get pregnant soon should avoid taking this supplement also. High levels of melatonin in the blood can act in a similar manner as many contraceptives out there, which can obviously complicate a pregnancy.

That may seem scary, however this shouldn’t turn off the average person from taking a melatonin supplement. It is a very non toxic substance out there, making it relatively safe to take. Taking melatonin can help to alleviate your problems with erectile dysfunction, will keep you energized and improve your mood as well.

Can Melatonin Help with Erectile Dysfunction? Why This Hormone Is so Important for Your Sexual Health

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